Introducing English Semantics Faculté de science humaine, cadi ayaad université, marrakech, FLSH, Marrakech, Maroc
Posté le mars 4, 2017 / 136

Table of content : 
Preface xi

1 The study of meaning 1

1.1 The systematic study of meaning 2

1.2 The nature of language 3

1.3 Language and the individual 5

1.4 Demonstrating semantic knowledge 8

2 Language in use 17

2.1 Pragmatics 18

2.2 Natural and conventional signs 19

2.3 Linguistic signs 22

2.4 Utterance and sentence 26

2.5 Prosody 30

2.6 Non-verbal communication 35

3 The dimensions of meaning 41

3.1 Reference and denotation 42

3.2 Connotation 44

3.3 Sense relations 46

3.4 Lexical and grammatical meanings 49

3.5 Morphemes 51

3.6 Homonymy and polysemy 52

3.7 Lexical ambiguity 55

3.8 Sentence meaning 56

4 Semantic roles 61

4.1 Sentence and proposition 62

4.2 Semantic roles 66

4.2.1 Valency zero 68

4.2.2 Valency one 69

4.2.3 Valency two 73

4.3 Some changes in valency 78

5 Lexical relations 85

5.1 Lexical fields 87

5.2 Kinship 90

5.3 Hyponymy 92

5.4 Synonymy 96

5.5 Antonymy 100

5.6 Binary and non-binary antonyms 101

5.7 A comparison of four relations 104

5.8 Converse antonyms 105

5.9 Symmetry and reciprocity 107

5.10 Expressions of quantity 110

6 Transition and transfer predicates 115

6.1 Transition 116

6.2 Transfer

7 Reference 129

7.1 Referents and referring expressions 131

7.2 Extension and intension 132

7.3 Some different kinds of referents 134

7.3.1 Unique and non-unique referents 135

7.3.2 Concrete and abstract referents 135

7.3.3 Countable and non-countable referents 136

7.4 Different ways of referring 139

7.4.1 Generic and non-generic reference 141

7.4.2 Specific and non-specific reference 142

7.4.3 Definite and indefinite reference 142

7.5 Deixis 144

7.6 Anaphora 145

7.7 Shifts in ways of referring 150

7.8 Referential ambiguity 151

8 Sentences as arguments 155

8.1 Full statement clauses 157

8.2 Question clauses 160

8.3 Infinitive clauses 161

8.4 Gerund clauses 163

8.5 Non-factual clauses 164

8.6 Verbal nouns 165

8.7 Comparing types of clauses 167

8.8 Syntactic ambiguity 169

9 Speech acts 175

9.1 The form of sentences and the purpose of utterances 176

9.2 Analysis of speech acts 180

9.3 Seven kinds of speech acts 183

9.3.1 Assertive utterances 183

9.3.2 Performative utterances 185

9.3.3 Verdictive utterances 187

9.3.4 Expressive utterances 188

9.3.5 Directive utterances 189

9.3.6 Commissive utterances 192

9.3.7 Four speech acts compared 194

9.3.8 Phatic utterances 194

10 Aspect 197

10.1 Generic and specific predications 199

10.2 Stative predicates and dynamic predicates 200

10.3 Durative and punctual 202

10.4 Telic and atelic 206

10.5 Ingressive, continuative, egressive aspect 209

10.5.1 Predicates of location 209

10.5.2 Predicates of possession 210

10.5.3 Predicates of cognition 211

10.5.4 Event predicates 212

10.5.5 Nouns and adjectives as predicates 214

10.5.6 Aspectual verbs 215

10.6 Prospective and retrospective 219

10.7 Some grammatical expressions of aspect 220

10.7.1 The prospective 220

10.7.2 The perfect or retrogressive 221

10.7.3 The progressive 222

11 Factivity, implication and modality 229

11.1 Factivity 230

11.2 Implicative predicates 233

11.3 Modality 239

12 A variety of predicates 251

12.1 Attitudinal predicates 252

12.2 Enabling and preventing 257

12.3 Perceptual predicates 260

Type d'annonce : Livres
Emplacement : Marrakech - Safi
Pages : 345 Pages
Auteur : Charles W.Kreidler
Langue : English
Domaine : Linguistics
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